Friday Focus

This week's quote is by W. Mitchell.   He's had to overcome more obstacles in his life than most of us would be able to handle,  and yet, he still looks at the bright side of things. 

I think this passage could be used as inspiration for writers, especially when we're having a hard time.  (Coming to a wall in our writing, a complete block, querying disappointments, ect.)


What I focus on in life is what I get. And if I concentrate on how bad I am or how wrong I am or how inadequate I am, if I concentrate on what I can’t do and how there’s not enough time in which to do it, isn’t that what I get every time? And when I think about how powerful I am, and when I think about what I have left to contribute, and when I think about the difference I can make on this planet, then that’s what I get. You see, I recognize that it’s not what happens to you; it’s what you do about it.


Isn't it a good one?  It's easy to let ourselves get down, focus on what we're having a hard time with (whatever it may be, writing or otherwise), to allow ourselves to be pulled into that hole of despair.  But we all have a purpose.  We all have something to contribute.  

If you'd like to learn more about W. Mitchell, check out his website here.

Happy Friday!

4 comments:

Travener said...

There are just SO MANY off-color jokes I could make based on that...but that would be wrong. The sentiment is a good one. I am trying to concentrate on the positive. Though you know that's been a little tough, lately. At least the sun finally came out here.

coffeelvnmom said...

YAY! The sun is a good start, Travener;) I do wish you the best, I really do. I haven't even been able to get as far as you, and it's so frustrating. I can't imagine how hard it must be to sit back and wait like you're having to do!

Anita said...

I took a quick peek at his web site. It's almost as if the unfortunate things happened to him so that he can use it to help others.

Roland D. Yeomans said...

Love the quote.

A Lakota elder was visiting New York and surprised his host as he stopped as he walked down a busy street.

He went to a shop corner, bent down, and picked up a chirping cricket. He deposited it the planter of a store next door.

"I can't believe you heard that cricket in all this noise," said his host.

The Lakota pulled out a fifty cent piece from his jean's pocket. He flipped it high into the air where it hit the concrete.

A half dozen people spun around to look, then they sprinted to see who could snatch up the coin first.

The Lakota sighed sadly, "You hear what you listen for."

Love your blog, Roland